News

    The Curating Contemporary Design MA students visited the Kazakh city Almaty as part of their research. Image credit: REX features

    Kingston School of Art students travelled to Kazakhstan at the invitation of the British Council to help plan an exhibition which aims to raise the profile of Kazakh design.

    Curating Contemporary Design MA students were given a project brief to research Kazakhstan’s emerging design identity. Different groups explored the Kazakh people’s nomadic heritage, disrupted by Soviet rule for much of the 20th Century until independence was declared in 1991.

    The winning entry, named A Chest of Future Memories – a reference to the large chests given as presents to Kazakh newlyweds – was chosen to form the basis of the exhibition at EXPO 2017: Future Energy taking place in Astana, capital of Kazakhstan.

    The trip comes at an exciting time for the Faculty, as it prepares to return to its original name of Kingston School of Art in September to celebrate its art school ethos and heritage as one of the country’s leading providers of art and design education.

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    Stanley Picker Gallery is pleased to present an evening of dance inspired by Yemi Awosile’s Orishirishi – a new body of research that casts a lens on the insatiable desire to maintain a sense of place and ownership over one’s identity through outward public personas.

    Exhibited within ‘changing rooms’ in the main gallery space, the title of this work is a Nigerian (Yoruba) word taken from Awosile’s family tribe’s vocabulary, loosely meaning ‘an assortment of different things’ and showcases a collection of textiles which classify materials as an arrangement of experiences, alongside multi-media print, t-shirts and acoustic drapes.

    The dance pieces will be performed by Pinelopi Kefou, Rebecca Korang and Anna Guzak – all final year students of Kingston University’s Dance programme under the tutelage of course lecturers Daniela Perazzo Domm and Elena Catalano, and are currently being workshopped in collaboration with Awolsile. As part of their research the trio are participating in practical and print-based workshops, and for the performance itself hope to don some of their own creations along with bespoke pieces by Awosile!

    Performances will be staged at regular intervals within the main gallery space, allowing the visitors to move through, and interact with the exhibition – and music of hip hop artists Khirkee 17 – alongside dancers.

    We invite all to join us for this unique and revealing event. Entrance is free.

    For more information about this project and others please contact Natalie Kay on 020 8417 4074 or email n.kay@kingston.ac.uk.

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    Dominic Postlethwaite’s project looks at the process of crushed bending.

    Calls for London independence following Brexit and the challenges of commuter travel chaos are just some of the themes addressed by artists and designers showcasing work at this year’s eagerly anticipated Kingston University undergraduate degree show.

    Industry professionals will be greeted by installations, interactive artworks and live performance pieces at the Knights Park campus as the Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture returns to its original name, re-introducing itself as Kingston School of Art.

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    Some of the award-winning designs by Megan Greenfield

    A fashion collection inspired by the Renaissance, surrealist art and the abstract prints of fashion designer Zandra Rhodes has won the prestigious Anne Tyrrell Student Design Award.

    Megan Greenfield scooped the award and a £5,000 prize for a project she named Illogical Fantasies. The judging panel highlighted her use of print and pattern, the modern and innovative shapes she created, and praised her sophisticated colour palette.

    “I’m currently influenced by the glamour and experimentalism of the late seventies, personified in style icons like Bianca Jagger and David Bowie,” Megan explained.

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    Left to Right: Gini Stirling – Creative Skillset, Steven Dell – Kingston University course leader BA fashion, Megan Greenfield and Wendy Baker – Kingston University senior lecturer. Photo credit: Alex Martin

    Final year BA Graphic Design students plastered the streets of Shoreditch with the entire text of US historian Timothy Snyder’s new book, On Tyranny, chapter by chapter.

    In what is believe to be a first for the publishing industry, the Vintage design team, part of publishers Penguin Random House, worked with students to to bring each chapter of the book to life and displayed them in a sequence of large-scale posters along Leonard Street.

    The eye-catching designs, which took inspiration from 1930s-era propaganda tools, attracted widespread media attention in the United Kingdom from publications including The Guardian and It’s Nice That.

    The posters illustrated the author’s lessons on how to resist tyranny with striking graphics and major political undertones themed in black, white and red.

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    Senior research fellow in the history of art at Kingston University, Dr Jonathan Black has released a new book detailing the representations of one of Britain’s most famous war heroes, entitled ‘Winston Churchill in British Art, 1900 to the Present Day’.

    In the heavily-illustrated book which contains 100 plates by more than 70 artists in its 280 pages, Dr Black covers the changing image of Churchill in a time of mass-produced cartoons in newspapers, through to photographs, scultpures and paintings.

    Dr Black said his book is the first on the subject of Churchill’s image. “I was interested in exploring the extent to which Churchill was complicit in the creation of his own ‘look’,” he explained. “It took me the best part of two years to research and I had the help of the Churchill Archive in Churchill College, Cambridge.”

    “The book also includes some striking, more recent images by Banksy and Marcus Harvey, which depict him as a jovial punk rocker complete with Mohican hairstyle and by Ralph Steadman in which he is transformed into a genial, cigar-smoking cat,” he said.

    The book, covered by the popular image of Churchill as a bulldog standing guard over England in June 1940, received an enthusiastic review from the London Review of Books which described it as a brisk and enjoyable biography.

    Dr Black’s book is now available for purchase.